Communications

Cyberattacks on the Publics

Cyberattacks on the Publics

As the pace and magnitude of cyberattacks have increased around the world, a Pew Research Center survey in 26 countries among 27,612 respondents shows that people in multiple countries think it is likely that future hacks will target government data, public infrastructure, and elections. Opinion is mixed, however, on whether their nations are prepared for such events. In many cases, views about a country’s preparedness are shaped in part by partisanship and attitudes toward the party in power. People who support the governing party are often more likely to think their nation can handle a sizeable cyber hack.

Naive Realism Podcast

Naive Realism Podcast

In psychology, they call it naive realism, the tendency to believe that the other side is wrong because they are misinformed, that if they knew what you knew, they would change their minds to match yours. What we don't think, however, is maybe WE are the ones who are wrong. We never go into the debate hoping to be enlightened, only to crush our opponents. Listen in this episode as legendary psychologist Lee Ross explains how to identify, avoid, and combat this most pernicious of cognitive mistakes.

Podcast: Labels and Cognitive Processes

Podcast: Labels and Cognitive Processes

We are each born labeled. In moments of ambiguity, those labels can change the way people make decisions about us. As a cognitive process, it is invisible, involuntary, and unconscious – and that’s why psychology is working so hard to understand it.

Podcast: Sleep Deprivation and Bias

Podcast: Sleep Deprivation and Bias

If you could compare the person you were before you became sleep deprived to the person after, you’d find you’ve definitely become...lesser than. In this episode, David McRaney sits down with two researchers whose latest work suggests sleep deprivation also affects how you see other people. In tests of implicit bias, negative associations with certain religious and cultural categories emerged after people started falling behind on rest.

Podcast: Moral Arguments and the Empathy Gap

Podcast: Moral Arguments and the Empathy Gap

“Raise your words, not your voice. It is rain that grows flowers, not thunder.” - Rumi

In this divisive and polarized era how do you bridge the political divide between left and right? How do you persuade the people on the other side to see things your way? New research by sociologist Robb Willer and psychologist Matthew Feinberg suggests that the answer is in learning how to cross something they call the empathy gap.

Podcast: Cognitive Perception, Positive Messaging for Learning, and Optimism

Podcast: Cognitive Perception, Positive Messaging for Learning, and Optimism

In this episode, Tali Sharot, a cognitive neuroscientist and psychologist at University College London, explains our' innate optimism bias. When the brain estimates the outcome of future events, it tends to reduce the probability of negative outcomes for itself, but not so much for other people. Sharot explains why and details how we can use our knowledge of this mental quirk to our advantage both personally and institutionally.

Podcast: Innovation, Insights, and Connections

Podcast: Innovation, Insights, and Connections

In this episode of the YANSS Podcast, David McRaney sits down with legendary science historian James Burke. In Connections, he offered an “alternate view of history” in which great insights took place because of anomalies and mistakes, because people were pursuing one thing, but it lead somewhere surprising or was combined with some other object or idea they could never have imagined by themselves. Innovation took place in the spaces between disciplines, when people outside of intellectual and professional silos, unrestrained by categorical and linear views, synthesized the work of people still trapped in those institutions, who, because of those institutions, had no idea what each other was up to and therefore couldn’t predict the trajectory of even their own disciplines, much less history itself.

Cultural and Digital Relevancy is the New Language

Cultural and Digital Relevancy is the New Language

As U.S. Hispanics increasingly turn to online sources to inform their decisions and purchases, brands are working to engage this tech-savvy audience with relevant content and ads across platforms and devices. Here are several ways to integrate cultural and digital relevancy into brand communications.

The Art of Brand Loyalty: Lessons from Legislators

The Art of Brand Loyalty: Lessons from Legislators

The news on emails released by Jeb Bush and Hillary Clinton have prompted public officials to look at their online communication and brand longevity differently. Every elected official is a public brand, and experienced legislators are using creative content and new technologies to cultivate brand loyalty. Here are several lessons we can learn from them.

The People Side of Online Brand Management

The People Side of Online Brand Management

An integrated approach to strengthen the lifetime value of a brand goes beyond marketing and advertising. It is about the people side of brand management, how brand managers respond to real-time situations, and how evolving changes are incorporated into the process and measurements of success.