Election 2020

Political Independents

Political Independents

Independents often are portrayed as political free agents with the potential to alleviate the nation’s partisan divisions. The reality is that most independents are not all that “independent” politically. An overwhelming majority of independents (81%) continue to “lean” toward either the Republican Party or the Democratic Party. Among the public overall, 17% are Democratic-leaning independents, while 13% lean toward the Republican Party.

Cyberattacks on the Publics

Cyberattacks on the Publics

As the pace and magnitude of cyberattacks have increased around the world, a Pew Research Center survey in 26 countries among 27,612 respondents shows that people in multiple countries think it is likely that future hacks will target government data, public infrastructure, and elections. Opinion is mixed, however, on whether their nations are prepared for such events. In many cases, views about a country’s preparedness are shaped in part by partisanship and attitudes toward the party in power. People who support the governing party are often more likely to think their nation can handle a sizeable cyber hack.

The 2020 Electorate

The 2020 Electorate

Voter turnout will play an important role in determining the relative electoral influence of different racial and ethnic groups. While demographic changes unfold slowly, it’s already clear that the 2020 electorate will be unique in several ways. Nonwhites will account for a third of eligible voters – their largest share ever – driven by long-term increases among certain groups, especially Hispanics. At the same time, one-in-ten eligible voters will be members of Generation Z, the Americans who will be between the ages 18 and 23 next year. That will occur as Millennials and all other older generations account for a smaller share of eligible voters than they did in 2016.